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Good for the body. Thrive.
Good for the body. Thrive.
Good for the body. Thrive.
Good for the body. Thrive.
Good for the body. Thrive.

Good for the body. Thrive.

05 August 2014

"Eat Plants. Feel Better." That’s the first line of words you see when you visit thriveforward.com.

For Brendan Brazier, former professional Ironman triathlete and two-time Canadian 50km Ultra Marathon Champion (say no more), eating plans-based was only the start. 

Nowadays Brendan is a successful performance nutrition consultant, author of the Thrive book series and formulator of the Vega line (plant-based nutritional products). 

The main question he had was: does eating high - and avoiding low - net gain foods aids recovery & performance? The clear answer is: Yes, they do! And above that: it’s a small investment for a big return. 

I’m a (vegan)runner myself so interested in the thrive philosophy. High net gain means ‚little digestive energy spent, substantial level of micronutrients gained’. That’s basically it. Highly processed, refined, denatured food requires that significantly more digestive energy be spent to break it down in the process of transferring its caloric energy to us.

That said: the base is eating plant-based food which gave me already tons of extra energy than when I was still eating cheese, drank milk,… So Thrive was extra stimulating.

Brendans ‚Thrive Cookbook’ was inspirational for me as a runner so I can recommend reading it when you want to perform higher as an athlete or to anyone who just wants to feel less tired all day long.

I still feel I’m at the start of being an vegan athlete, so I’m off for my daily run!

thriveforward.com - brendanbrazier.com


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